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The Royal Society of Queensland is the senior learned society in the State, founded in 1884.   It traces its ancestry to the Royal Society of London, founded in 1660. Royal Societies have been established independently in every State: see link .
The Society seeks to increase respect for intellectual inquiry. It encourages original research and the application of evidence-based method to policy-making and decision-making. The Society advocates on behalf of science and provides a forum for scientists and lay people to involve themselves in the progress of science in society, with ‘science’ defined broadly. The Society networks between disciplinary specialists, government and the community; holds seminars crossing jurisdictional and sectoral silos; and publishes the annual Proceedings, a journal of record, now in its 124th volume.
Membership: There are no educational or professional barriers to membership. The Membership page offers a portal for digital enrolment and renewal.
Queensland Science Network: The Queensland Science Network is a collaboration between some 24 not-for-profit scientific and naturalists’ societies. Its website is a portal to each group and their events.
Queensland Policy Network: The Queensland Policy Network is a nascent forum to foster dialogue within Queensland’s policy community. It seeks to counter ‘fake news’ and policy-making based upon ideology, preconceived positions or single-disciplinary enthusiasms.

 

Recent News

Corinne Unger presented at Mt Coot-tha quarry forum

Corinne Unger

Royal Society member Corinne Unger presented at a Mt Coot-tha quarry forum hosted on 8 October by Brisbane City Councillor Michael Berkman and Mt Coot-tha Alliance to kick off the conversation on rehabilitation and closure planning. (more…)

Bustard Head and Double Island Point Lighthouses

Ron Turner, former Ranger-in-Charge at Cooloola National Park, with wife Yvonne, has written a charming e-book Living at a Lighthouse, chronicling sojourns at Bustard Head and Double Island Point lighthouses on Queensland’s central-south coast. See his Member’s Interest page.


Research Fund Awards

We are pleased to announce the award of two grants in the second round of the Research Fund.

Koala microbiomes by Dr Michaela Blyton of the University of Queensland. We are delighted that the Australian Koala Foundation has agreed to sponsor this award. This has enabled the Society to make a second grant.

Koala Retrovirus infection by Dr Bonnie Quigley, University of the Sunshine Coast.

Projects on green sea turtles , spot-tailed quolls and sea-weeding coral reefs were deemed meritorious runners-up and philanthropists are invited to support them with tax-deductible donations.  More information on the Research Fund page.


Royal Societies of Australia takes a step forward

Queensland has agreed to join the nascent Royal Societies of Australia, a collaboration between the state-based Royal Societies. This step recognises the national dimension of many policy issues that exercise Queensland’s scientists: water management, stewardship of pastoral lands, mine rehabilitation and preventative health to mention just a few.

The RSA will focus on outreach of scientific knowledge rather than ceremony and is differentiated from the Australian Academy of Science in that it does not aspire to be an elite-level academy. Further information on the RSA website.


SEGRA 2019 presentations now available

Member Kate Charters, Principal of Sustainable Economic Growth for Regional Australia (SEGRA), has advised that the presentations from the August 2019 conference are now available. Follow this link. Some presentations are backed up by full articles. Many themes are relevant to the Society’s Rangelands Policy Dialogue initiative.

SEGRA 2020 is to be held on 22-24 September 2020 in Mt Gambier, Limestone Coast SA.


Rangelands Initiative

The Queensland Rangelands Declaration was released on 20 August 2019. This is the first documentary outcome of a two-day discussion with a difference held on 1,2 July 2019. See the Rangelands Declaration webpage for the one-page Declaration and subsequent commentary and activities.

See the Rangelands Policy Dialogue webpage for the program and briefing papers, including “Rangelands Briefs”. These briefs alone will build into a valuable snapshot of contemporary knowledge of the rangelands.

See the Stewardship incentives webpage for materials leading up to the Dialogue.


Gravestones: Publicly funded research underpins the knowledge economy

“Australia has a long and inglorious record of establishment by governments of valuable, valued and successful science-based initiatives … only to later abolish them. The results are loss of focus, loss of group knowledge, loss of expertise, loss of analytical capability, wasted effort and resources, wasted expenditure and – most of all – wasted opportunity.”

So commences a draft paper by member David Marlow. The Tables from his manuscript are available at Gravestones . Mr Marlow seeks critical comment from those who have personal knowledge of these organisations. See dedicated page for contact details.


Trevor Clifford’s work lives on

The world of science lost a true scientist and gentleman in the passing of Harold Trevor (Trevor) Clifford PhD DSc FLS FAIBiol OAM, on 4 May 2019.

Professor Clifford was invested as an Honorary Life Member of the Society on 24 March 2017. In his 70th year of scholarly activity, he officiated at the launch of the inaugural round of applications for the Society’s Research Fund, on 5 June 2018.

The Society shares the family’s sense of loss of a gentleman and a scholar in the finest tradition.

Trevor Clifford’s discoveries will live on. Four of his former associates have compiled a list of his scholarly publications: it runs to more than 10 pages. See his Members’ Collections page for more information.


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